In Puritan America, a married woman’s illicit affair with a minister landed her in jail. After her release, Hester Prynne was sentenced to forever wear a big red “A” on her dress. 

Nearly 375 years later, the U.S. continues to be scandalized, tantalized and perplexed by sex, especially about sex offenders. Tough on crime, we’re still struggling to learn: 

  • Why domestic violence and incest are so under-reported by victims? 
  • Why most people think every sexual offender is a serial rapist? 
  • Why, even among therapists, many continue to believe sex-offenders to be untreatable? 
  • Why supervision after offenders’ release tends to-wards punitive rather than restorative? 

It’s time to bring the subject of sex crime out of the dark ages, time to help victims shed the shame and trauma of their experience. It’s also time to allow offenders an opportunity to show they can change, make amends and start to earn back trust and acceptance from society.

The Book is Now Available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Elsewhere

Sixty years of social work condensed into three years of writing...you get the results in one book that aims to:

  • Draw a parallel between sex offenders who have been convicted and those who have not. The excesses of powerful men in clergy, media and politics in recent years proves the case that not all those with "criminal thinking" have been apprehended, punished and treated for their violent sexual behavior.
  •  Show how one label - Sex Offender - is not adequate to describe a wide range of illegal acts. At one end of the spectrum there are teenage males serving time for having sex with their underage girlfriend.  At the other end of the spectrum are the pedophile priests, coaches, television and film industry icons, and politicians who abuse their privilege and power to victimize those with less power.
  • Talk about treatment, in its myriad forms. Treatment is mostly about the offender deciding  that he (or she) wants to change. After that, the person must systematically work with professionals to untangle the mess of their life, including their own victimhood.

Finally, the book is an appeal to the millions of people whose lives have been affected by sexual violence. There is power in a society demanding accountability from abusers. It's healthy to take part in your own recovery from trauma. Likewise, there is a healing benefit when we can accept back into society those who have repented and who show they are trustworthy again.

There's a big piece of the puzzle missing in our national thrall with sexual abuse, and this book can add a lot of dimension to the conversation, making room for growth, safety and public health.

Sex Abuse, St. Valentine, and Geoffrey Chaucer

Sex Abuse, St. Valentine, and Geoffrey Chaucer

The Anatomy of Male Privilege

The Anatomy of Male Privilege