In Puritan America, a married woman’s illicit affair with a minister landed her in jail. After her release, Hester Prynne was sentenced to forever wear a big red “A” on her dress. 

Nearly 375 years later, the U.S. continues to be scandalized, tantalized and perplexed by sex, especially about sex offenders. Tough on crime, we’re still struggling to learn: 

  • Why domestic violence and incest are so under-reported by victims? 
  • Why most people think every sexual offender is a serial rapist? 
  • Why, even among therapists, many continue to believe sex-offenders to be untreatable? 
  • Why supervision after offenders’ release tends to-wards punitive rather than restorative? 

It’s time to bring the subject of sex crime out of the dark ages, time to help victims shed the shame and trauma of their experience. It’s also time to allow offenders an opportunity to show they can change, make amends and start to earn back trust and acceptance from society.

A Year at the Post

A Year at the Post

Writing a book about sex crimes has been difficult for us. It has also provided hope. Because in the past year, it has become clear that the U.S. is on the brink of change.

  • The number and frequency of people (mostly women) stepping forward to say #MeToo and "Enough!" is heartening.
  • The calls for reforming behaviors will undoubtedly result in more equity between people, whether sexually, socially, or financially.

When we talk to people about the book coming out this month, the response has been positive. "It couldn't be coming out at a better time," we hear frequently. And because the book looks at the crime from a variety of angles, the range of possible remedies becomes broader. 

In addition to the who and how severe the crimes, the book also looks at existing and effective treatment for a broad range of sex offenses, whether committed by men or women. And, because victims and the communities in which these crimes take place are so impacted, we discuss how the community must be  part of the solution.

In the end, it is our contention that a sex crime can be a turning point for the offender, if the person wants to change. It can also be healthy for the community to which the offender returns, if society can adopt  a reconciliation process - aka "restorative justice."  In that realm, victimization is reduced and  public safety increased. 

The Anatomy of Male Privilege

The Anatomy of Male Privilege

#MeToo Campaign is on the Right Track...except for the Ending!

#MeToo Campaign is on the Right Track...except for the Ending!